5 mn with… David August Trimble

Profession: Bike racer, designer, engineer, photographer etc…


 

Who are you David?

I am defined in most part by being a member of the Trimble family   I’m 27, the second oldest of eight kids (4 boys and 4 girls).  My dad is the oldest of eight boys.  I was born in Anchorage, Alaska and lived in Boston, Northwest Arkansas, Houston, a brief stint in hell, Indianapolis, before finally coming home to NYC four years ago.

At the age of 12 I raced go-karts. By the time I turned 18, I was racing professionally and traveling all over North America. I wanted to be a Formula 1 driver. As my parents didn’t have enough money to support my expensive career pursuit I relied completely on sponsorship money that I raised.  This eventually ran out and I had to give up… I had also blown all my college money on racing so I began working as a ‘mechanic’ on a Formula Renault team eventually making my way up to the Indycar level.  I spent the next four years of my life slaving away on racecars.  While most kids were attending college I was working 120 hours weeks and traveling non-stop around the world.  The pressure was intense and I soon realized that the ‘hardened’ vets who had been doing it for many years were miserable drunks with broken homes.  I had to get out.

Because I had amassed a slave like work ethic and razor sharp mechanical and problem solving skills my uncle Sam hired me to help manage the construction and custom details on his high-end architectural projects in New York City.  Completely burned out with anything that had an engine on it I moved to NYC with nothing but a suitcase and a bicycle. I have now been at Sam Trimble Design for four years.  The job introduces me to many amazing people and places and I become a part of the city that would otherwise be completely foreign.  Our clients have whole collections named after them at the MET. They are Hollywood stars, and run giant corporations.  Being a part of this juxtaposition next to my humble life is one of the most interesting facets of living in NYC.

You mentioned coming to NY with just a suitcase and a bicycle, I’m guessing the bicycle is a big part of your life?

My father and his brothers are all inventors, engineers, and architects.  In the early days they developed and raced some of the first ever carbon fiber racing bicycles.  One of my uncle Brent’s frame designs went on to win a gold medal in the Sydney Olympics.  Although cycling was always a part of my life I did not start riding seriously until I was 21 years old.

I started riding in Texas.  After moving to NYC I became heavily involved in the cycling scene and began racing bikes at a fanatical level.  I race mountain, road, cyclocross, and suicidal alley cat city races.  The energy and commodore of cycling makes NYC feel like home to me.  The best part is that I am carrying on with the Trimble family tradition of bicycle fanatics.  My siblings and father all bond around the bike and to this day almost all of us compete.

You have organized, The Red Hook Criterium for the past 3 years. A combination of a race and an Art exhibit, tell us more about it?

Most of my friends are bike racers who won’t come out to a social event unless it involves a chance at personal glory.  For this reason I started holding a bike race in conjunction with my birthday party.  The race is held at night in Red Hook on a short, twisty, and dangerous course.  Over the years it has grown into a popular event with hundreds of spectators and racers.  This last year I combined the race with a group art show called “The Unifying Machine”.  The show had over thirty artists exhibiting a wide range of work.  The Red Hook Criterium is basically an art show, bike race, and massive party all rolled into one event.

At “The Unifying Machine” this year, I have seen pictures you shot; are you a photographer as well?

On a basic level I am a photographer because I am on an endless pursuit to live a life that when recorded leaves behind interesting images that will supplement my memory.

Living in the culturally limited Arkansas and Houston and having the opportunity to travel opened my eyes to the world.  I began taking pictures with the intention to try and capture this flow of constant new experiences and images.  Each new place and each new character I met would change me in a way that I felt had to be recorded.  Moving to the huge world of NYC further increased my desire to record everything and everyone I experienced along the way.

Professionally I haven’t started a photography career but as my skills and style develop I am seeing opportunities to use photography beyond a personal level.

Which celebrity would you be flattered to see participate at the Red Hook Criterium?

As far as celebrities go I wouldn’t mind seeing Kayne West show up on his fashion accessory Cinelli Vigorelli so we could lap him 5 times.  Actually most of the local cycling celebrities I want to see racing the Crit already participate.  I really want my brother Nathan to compete next year.  He’s by far the strongest Trimble and could give our family a victory in the race.

What does a city like NY brings to you?

It gives you a chance to be exactly the person you want to be.  No matter what kind of weird or nerdy thing you are into there is likely to be a whole community full of like-minded people.

What is your favorite place in the city?

My favorite place is this massive abandoned Grain Terminal in Red Hook.  I often go exploring in there at night.  The left over machines inside the terminal are very old and incredibly designed.  It gives me the same feeling as when I’m in Alaska exploring old gold mining ruins.

Where would be the best place to buy a good bike?

Depends on what kind of bike.  For a good city bike something on Craigslist is place to find a good deal.  It just requires a little education to spot the lemons.  The Times Up organization is a great place to learn how to build your own bike from old parts and spend next to nothing.  A full on racing bike should be obtained through of very personal experience of picking each part specifically.

What’s next? Any project?

I’m bringing the Red Hook Criterium to Milan, Italy on October 15th.  It’ll be held on the dark streets of an industrial area of Milan.  A dozen riders from NYC are making to the trip to compete against some of the best riders in Europe.
Beyond that I’m working on organizing my first solo photography exhibit, which I hope will be ready by next summer.

Click here to find out more information about the RED HOOK CRIT MILANO
© Photo with orange sweater and bike: Jed Stewart. Photo B&W: Hannah Trimble. David racing : Ed Glazer. Art-show: Chris Thorman. Grain terminal: David Trimble
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Neverland Lost: A portrait of Michael Jackson

NeverLand Lost: A portrait of Michael Jackson takes us deeper into Michael’s mystery world. Henry Leutwyler, famous portrait photographer, also known for his incredible gift for bringing still-life objects back to life, satisfies our curiosity in his excellent book unveiling Michael Jackson’s belongings -which, until now, have been locked in storage crates in Neverland. This book is a pure source of excitement that’ll nourish your passion for the mysterious legend that is, and will always be… the King of Pop.

Get your own signed copy of the book on Wednesday June 16th from 6 to 8 pm at Dashwood Books 33 Bond Street. bet Bowery and Lafayette (Tel: 212.387.8520)

Neverland Lost, A Portrait of Michael Jackson by Henry Leutwyler
Price $45. Visit the website for more inf. The book can also be purchased on amazon.com

MONA KUHN: NATIVE Opening reception and artist talk

“Native”, Mona Kuhn’s new show is opening tonight at Flowers Gallery in Chelsea.

This exhibit features her latest series of photographs also published in a new book –Native (Steidl, Winter 2009/10).

Acclaimed photographer, Mona Kuhn returns from her birthplace, Brazil, with sensual images of captivating nudes, dense jungle landscape, and sparse interior of an abandoned apartment. 

MONA KUHN: NATIVE from April 9th – May 15th, 2010
Opening reception Thursday, April 8th from 6 – 8 pm
Artist talk: Saturday April 10 at 3 pm
Flowers Gallery is located 529 West 20th St. Tel: 1 212 439 17 00

5 mn with… Simon Chaput

Profession: Photographer


Who are you Simon?

I am half French, half English and was born in France 57 years ago. I come from a small town and studied to become a vet. I was a sailing instructor in southern Brittany at the age of 16 and spent my military service as a sailing instructor in Tahiti. There are worst places to be sent I must admit….

I opened a Gallery in France in the mid seventies and came to New York in 1983 for a week to help one of my artists find a gallery here, I fell in love with the energy of the city and have been living here ever since.

I met Jeanne Claude and Christo on my second week here and started working with them on their projects; it was a life changing experience.

Why did you choose to become a photographer?

Photography was always a passion for me, I got my first camera, a Kodak Brownie when I was 7 and fell in love with the magic it created. I started a photo club when I was at school and was shooting everything I could. After failing to get into a photo school, I spend the next 20 years away from photography.

In 1983, I discovered the New York art scene and that nourished my vision.

I was fascinated by the geometry of the urban landscape and that is when I had the urge to get back to photography.

I was lucky enough to join the Howard Greenberg Gallery back in 1997 and have focused my energy on photography since.

Your Nude series is gorgeous, tell us a bit about this project.

The nude series started in Death Valley. I loved the abstract qualities of the sand dunes and wanted to bring a nude in the landscape. It was a challenge when you know the work of artists like Edward Weston and others who have mastered it. I could shoot only one hour at sunrise and one at sunset.

While shooting, I realized that the body could become the landscape itself.

I came back to New York and started shooting in the studio so I could control the light and thereby the form. The body became the landscape.

Would you consider yourself a landscape photographer?

I am not sure if I really fit in that category. The work is more about playing with shape, light and the negative space that has a huge place in my photographs.

When you look at my work, you will notice the importance of the black.

How much time do you spend in the dark room?

I spend a lot of time in the darkroom, sometimes weeks in a row. I am still fascinated by the magic of the process and find that I need to spend many days to control the outcome precisely.

Do you have a dream project?

Dreams are meant to be pursued every new project is a dream project before it happens. It is at first an idea, then images are visualized and from that point on work makes them happen. The result is sometimes even a little different from the initial dreamed images; it is nearly always better as the work grows on itself.

Right now my dream project is the “Waterfalls” series.

Why did you decide to shoot NY? What does the city bring to you?

New York was a love story at first sight, living downtown when I first arrived, I was mesmerized by the tall buildings, narrow streets and by the shadows projected by these buildings, creating these wonderful geometric patterns.

I must have looked strange, I was walking the streets looking up and just enjoying the playfulness of the angular shapes. That has never changed.

Do you have a secret place in the New York?

If I tell you it wouldn’t be a secret anymore, but seriously I am always amazed by something that I hadn’t noticed before. The city changes so much depending on the time of day, the light and my perception of the city also changes with my mood. The secret is to get lost away from our usual paths.

What about the most beautiful views of the city?

Downtown around Wall Street, it is such a complex web of narrow streets.

What are your favorite things to do here?

I love having friends over for dinner, shopping at Di Palo’s, riding a bike in the city and Governor’s Island (a haven of peace and just a small boat ride away) playing tennis under the Williamsburg bridge, eating at “Minetta Tavern” or at “Antonucci’s”, having a small bite at “Blue Ribbon Bar” or a drink at the “Raines Law Room” and so much more…..

What’s next?

The “Waterfalls” series is not finished, so I will be taking more long treks in the wilderness looking for the perfect ones.

I also have a show opening at the Jackson Fine Art Gallery in Atlanta on March 26th, where they will show the Nudes and for the first time some of the Waterfalls.

For more info visit Simon Chaput’s website and  his facebook fan page

Simon’s addresses:
Di Palo’s:  200 Grand St.
Minetta Tavern: 113 MacDougal St.
Antonucci’s:  170 East 81 St.
Blue Ribbon Bar:  34 Downing St.
Raines Law Room:  48 W 17th St.

Don’t miss the AIPAD Photography Show

If you are in Manhattan for this lovely spring weekend don’t miss the AIPAD Photography Show. It is one of the most important international photography events and it is opening today.

More than 70 of the world’s leading fine art photography galleries will present a large selection of high-quality work including contemporary, modern and 19th century photographs, as well as photo-based art, video and new media.

AIPAD New YorkMarch 18th-21st, 2010
Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave & 67th St.

Show Hours
Thursday, March 18 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.Friday, March 19 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Saturday, March 20 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Sunday, March 21 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Victor Demarchelier : Creating Images

Victor Demarchelier’s photographs have been published in Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar and French Vogue. This exhibit features black-and-white photographs, some from studio sessions and some from a trip to India. CREATING IMAGES, a mix of his work from fashion shoots and personal projects, includes several pieces from his photographic collaborations with model Caroline Trentini. This is Victor Demarchelier’s solo debut at a New York gallery.

Opening tonight March 15th from 6 PM to 9 PM

Victor Demarchelier / Creating Images until April 5th, 2010
Clic Bookstore & Gallery: 424 Broome Street. tel: 1-212-219-9308

The Selby Is in Your Place

Todd Selby has been spoiling us for the past 2 years, allowing us into the personal spaces of the most creative and talented people from around the world. Houses, offices, or studios, always a great trips that satisfy our curiosity…

The project being such a success, with up to 35,000 visitors per day on his website, Selby has gone on to put a great book together which features over thirty profiles, many of which have never been seen before… Don’t miss out on this little jewel and pre-order your copy online… It belongs on your coffee table! 

The Selby Is in Your Place will be published on May 1st. Pre-order it on amazon.com for $23.

Helena Christensen by The Selby for French Vogue